The Evansville Junior Football League is proud of its unpaid staff and volunteers.   Through the years, many have come and many have gone but there are those that stayed to give beyond the call of duty.  It is that team spirit that you learn in a good football program and it is a good influence to have in everyone's lives.  We stop to commemorate those who have given their time and talents to make the Evansville Junior Football League the best junior football league program ever!

Mike Dietz

10 year 250Mike2

Many years ago, when I was too young to play football for the EJFL, I used to come watch my older brother play for the Lions. I would step in on occassion and be the unofficial waterboy for Randy Babb and Chuck Brunson. Little did I realize at the time, I was learning the game by just being around great coaches in a great organization. Thoses coaches, along with the players, treated me like I was part of their team, part of their "FAMILY".

Fast forward to 2003, my son Jordan was a 2nd grader and wanted to play football. EJFL was the only place I would trust to teach my son. Soon, we got the call from coach Eric Wytovak ( still active at EJFL )that Jordan was drafted by the Broncos. I began that season as just any ol' dad, sitting on the sidelines watching my kid play and learn. But, I was pleasently surprised to see that some of the same coaches were still involved at EJFL. Players from that old Lions team I knew so many years ago were also coaching. This proved to me what I already knew to be true....EJFL is a FAMILY! Through my son's 1st 4 years at EJFL, I was just a dad, watching youth football. But, I wasnt only watching my son, I was watching how he was coached, how the other teams were coached, how the league was ran, and just watching the overall commitment to the kids and the sport. I was impressed by the number of coaches at EJFL that do not have kids playing there, they are coaching for the love of coaching . In 2007, I was fortunate enough to be asked to be an assistant coach by the Lion's Head Coach at the time, Jason "Big Daddy" Cain. I was grateful for the opportunity, and figured I would coach 2 years ( Jordan's 6th and 7th grade seasons ) and then I would move on. However, I felt motivated to stay and help other kids continue to learn the game, and help prepare them for the Cub football level. After several years as an assistant coach, I was nominated to become the Head Coach of the Lions, which I gladly accepted. I have done my best to continue the FAMILY tradition that EJFL represents. At EJFL, we teach... We teach how to play, how to win, how to lose, how to become better players, and most importantly, how to become better people. Every practice, every game, for the last 10 years, I have mentioned, preached, coached the importance of FAMILY.

As I begin my 11th season with the EJFL, I will be trying out the role of Commissioner. I am honored to work along side people who have been in this league far longer than I, but share our common goals together. The path led by Randy Babb, Jon Martin, Eric Wytovak, Phill Cree, Miles Mann and many others, is a great path led by great leaders and I look forward to helping in any way needed. I hope my experience as well as my desire to help others ( both kids and parents ) enjoy our league can prove beneficial to everyone.It is my desire to hep continue the great tradition EJFL has worked so hard to instill, and to help move EJFL along to bigger and better things for our league to continue it's success. I love coaching and teaching, I love the game of football, and I love helping kids learn and succeed. EJFL provides me the opportunity to do all of that, and I am excited to beging another season with my EJFL FAMILY.Football is Family

Jon Martin

Jon Martin

 

My love of the game, and the will to coach children, came not long after my high school years. I played at EJFL, for the Cowboys, in 1994 and 1995. My coaches, the late James Torres and Don Turpin, were great coaches. Our success record was not the best, but they made sure we learned a lot and had a lot of fun. I wanted to coach because I loved the game itself, and enjoyed my time at EJFL, along with my high school football career at Mater Dei.

This was one way for me to give back to a league that gave me so much.
I began coaching the Packers in 2000. This was the first year for the Packers, at EJFL. I was Assistant Coach the first year and became Head Coach, in 2001.  My first year as Head Coach of the Packers, our stats proved the undefeated status. We qualified for the Cereal Bowl Championship Game, and won. During my coaching career at EJFL, the Packers have played in either the Cereal Bowl Championship Game or the Consolation Game, nine out of twelve years.

In 2015, I chose to move my coaching experience to the Junior League level, assistant coaching the Broncos.

In 2017, I took on the position of assistant coach of the Patriots.  We ended our season as Cereal Bowl runner up.

EJFL is the greatest league in Evansville. The results are extremely visible with Reitz and Mater Dei being the top two teams in the City, nearly every year. The youth at EJFL are primed from a young age, to know what is expected of them when they reach high school. It is also another way for the high school coaches to view their incoming players to know where they are capable of playing successfully, and where they need improvement.

In 2006, I was voted in as Vice President of the league. I have retained this position to the current date. It is a wonderful feeling to know you are a part of the league’s success.  With my position, it is my goal to continue to move to add more teams, in effort to allow the most out of each and every child’s experience.

 

l141994 - 1995 Played for the EJFL Cowboys

l172000 - 2014 Head Coach for the EJFL Packers

logo vp2006 - Current  Vice President of the EJFL 

l32015 - 2016 EJFL Broncos Assistant Coach

l72017 EJFL Patriots Assistant Coach

Eric Wytovak

My oldest son Daniel started playing football in 2002…his 3rd grade year.  He got drafted by the Bronco’s …an expansion team.  We received a phone call on that Sunday night from a guy with a really different name…”Wytovak.”  We were disappointed because my son’s best buddy was drafted by another team…the Titans.  I took my son to his first practice and I am embarrassed to admit I had a small chip on my shoulder.  I had a lot of experience with many other youth leagues that were the definition of “daddy ball” and knew in my heart I was sending my son to the same sort of arrangement.  I have never been more wrong about anything in my life…and if you’d ask my wife that is saying a lot…she would tell you I’m wrong most of the time.

Eric Wytovak asked me to help him coach the Broncos.  I’ve been standing alongside Coach Wytovak for nine seasons now.  What I’ve found in those nine seasons is the EJFL is anything but your typical “daddy ball” youth sports league.  It is the most organized, most fair, and absolutely the most genuine youth organization I’ve ever been a part of.  The EJFL is comprised of a small handful of commissioners and board members that pour hundreds of hours and hundreds of their own dollars into the program and it is all on a volunteer basis.  If it were not for the huge hearts of these commissioners and volunteers a lot of unfortunate kids in the west side might not have the opportunity to play little league football or cheer lead.

There are also a lot of coaches that spend 3 nights a week plus a few hours each Saturday to teach the west-side kids much more than just cheer lead or play football.  The best way to explain what Eric, the commissioners, and a lot of the other coaches do down at the EJFL fields is…they “mentor” the kids down there.

The easy part of coaching is teaching the kids to physically play football or cheer lead.  The toughest and most important thing the coaches and commissioners do is they mentor the kids to become young adults.  Many times for a lot of difficult reasons these coaches are the ones the kids talk to about their first boyfriend or girlfriend.  These same coaches are also the only people these kids have to talk to about a tough family situation they are trying to cope with.  These coaches also get to take their turn at classroom tutor when one of “their kids” falls behind in his or her schoolwork.  There have been a lot of Saturdays that Eric had to sit one of his best players out for part of a game because his star player was falling behind in school.  Eric and a lot of the other coaches understand how important it is to “get your work done in the classroom before you can get it done on the football field.”  Together Eric and I have seen several dozen of “our kids” grow up and succeed in the classroom and on the high school football field.  No greater satisfaction comes to us then when we see several of our past Bronco players (that could barely tie their football cleats) thrive at “The Bowl.”  Last Friday night Eric and I were fortunate enough to see 6 of our past players competing on the field at the same time.  Nearly a-fourth of the players on that field were “me and Eric’s kids.”  The names “Brishaun Horne, Adam Ricketts, Nathan Tidwell, Daniel Mann, Dakotah Richardt, and Ben Polk” echoed several times at The Bowl after they made one great play after another.  All six of these kids struggled at one time or another growing up at EJFL.  All six of these kids played together nine seasons ago on the long forgotten expansion Broncos.  With the help of Eric, the EJFL, and of course all of the behind-the-scenes work from the commissioners these 6 boys have become successful young men.

There are a lot of great things going on at the EJFL fields.  Football and cheer leading are only a couple of them.  I am forever in the debt of the commissioners and brother/sister coaches that let me tag along for the past nine years.

 

Eric Wytovak

Phillip Cree

EJFL President 2018
Commissioner  2015-2017


Head Coach Saints Senior Division 2010-2014

2011 Cereal Bowl runnner-up

 

Assistant Coach for Chargers in Senior Tackle 2008-2009

2009 Cereal Bowl Champions


Played 2 years on the Lions under Randy Babb in 1982 and1983
Cereal Bowl Consolation game winner

I have always enjoyed working with the boys and seeing them improve through the years, and looking forward to watching them play at the next level.

Miles Mann

My oldest son Daniel started playing football in 2002…his 3rd grade year.  He got drafted by the Bronco’s …an expansion team.  We received a phone call on that Sunday night from a guy with a really different name…”Wytovak.”  We were disappointed because my son’s best buddy was drafted by another team…the Titans.  I took my son to his first practice and I am embarrassed to admit I had a small chip on my shoulder.  I had a lot of experience with many other youth leagues that were the definition of “daddy ball” and knew in my heart I was sending my son to the same sort of arrangement.  I have never been more wrong about anything in my life…and if you’d ask my wife that is saying a lot…she would tell you I’m wrong most of the time.

Eric Wytovak asked me to help him coach the Broncos.  I’ve been standing alongside Coach Wytovak for nine seasons now.  What I’ve found in those nine seasons is the EJFL is anything but your typical “daddy ball” youth sports league.  It is the most organized, most fair, and absolutely the most genuine youth organization I’ve ever been a part of.  The EJFL is comprised of a small handful of commissioners and board members that pour hundreds of hours and hundreds of their own dollars into the program and it is all on a volunteer basis.  If it were not for the huge hearts of these commissioners and volunteers a lot of unfortunate kids in the west side might not have the opportunity to play little league football or cheer lead.

There are also a lot of coaches that spend 3 nights a week plus a few hours each Saturday to teach the west-side kids much more than just cheer lead or play football.  The best way to explain what Eric, the commissioners, and a lot of the other coaches do down at the EJFL fields is…they “mentor” the kids down there.


The easy part of coaching is teaching the kids to physically play football or cheer lead.  The toughest and most important thing the coaches and commissioners do is they mentor the kids to become young adults.  Many times for a lot of difficult reasons these coaches are the ones the kids talk to about their first boyfriend or girlfriend.  These same coaches are also the only people these kids have to talk to about a tough family situation they are trying to cope with.  These coaches also get to take their turn at classroom tutor when one of “their kids” falls behind in his or her schoolwork.  There have been a lot of Saturdays that Eric had to sit one of his best players out for part of a game because his star player was falling behind in school.  Eric and a lot of the other coaches understand how important it is to “get your work done in the classroom before you can get it done on the football field.”  Together Eric and I have seen several dozen of “our kids” grow up and succeed in the classroom and on the high school football field.  No greater satisfaction comes to us then when we see several of our past Bronco players (that could barely tie their football cleats) thrive at “The Bowl.”  Last Friday night Eric and I were fortunate enough to see 6 of our past players competing on the field at the same time.  Nearly a-fourth of the players on that field were “me and Eric’s kids.”  The names “Brishaun Horne, Adam Ricketts, Nathan Tidwell, Daniel Mann, Dakotah Richardt, and Ben Polk” echoed several times at The Bowl after they made one great play after another.  All six of these kids struggled at one time or another growing up at EJFL.  All six of these kids played together nine seasons ago on the long forgotten expansion Broncos.  With the help of Eric, the EJFL, and of course all of the behind-the-scenes work from the commissioners these 6 boys have become successful young men.


There are a lot of great things going on at the EJFL fields.  Football and cheer leading are only a couple of them.  I am forever in the debt of the commissioners and brother/sister coaches that let me tag along for the past nine years.